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HAPPY NEW YEAR!


How are you feeling on the flip side of Christmas? For some it can be a very intense time, with lots of social engagements and family visits, and, depending on your nature, this can either be an immensely enjoyable time of year or an incredibly draining one. Some people LOVE an active social calendar and rotation of visitors. For others, frequent quiet time is a necessity.


How much social connectedness a person needs influences how much aloneness they can tolerate - some people are quite happy with ‘alone time’ and find it necessary for restoration and energy or creative and spiritual growth. For others, solitude is not at all enjoyable and can lead to feelings of loneliness. As humans, we have evolved into social beings, emotional connectivity is a core part of being human. Our mental wellbeing benefits from time with other humans, but it’s the quality of this time that really makes the difference. Do you get what you need from your social interactions?


Whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert, developing ways of feeling comfortable being alone is a fabulous tool. It will help you feel connected to the universe, more grounded in yourself and mean it’s not the end of the world if your date cancels or another lockdown descends! So, let’s start with a simple breathing exercise to help relax our parasympathetic nervous system.

  • Begin by noticing your breath as you inhale and exhale through the nose.

  • Do not change the rhythm, just observe its natural movement.

  • Feel the sensation or temperature of the breath in the nostrils.

  • Then, after 5 complete breaths, begin to inhale for a long count of 4 and exhale for a long count of 4.

  • Once the initial ratio has been comfortably established, increase the ratio count to 6 and then 8.

Whether your New Year has started off packed, full and busy or quiet and contemplative, remember to find some quality time for yourself, and if it is a quiet start - you are not, we are all connected. Have a wonderful January.


The Blend Team x



* Source: psychologytoday.com / cba.ca / Photo credit: Kelly Sikkema @unsplash.com
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